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Mountain passion by Jonny Bobgan

Thanks Jonny Bobgan aka @inklineridge for taking part in our illustrators’ interview series!

How long have you been drawing?

For as long as I can remember. I loved drawing as a kid, though I wasn’t all that naturally talented at it. I like to think I was always the best artist in the room—unless there was another artist in the room.

Despite not being extremely gifted, I was fortunate to always have the support of my parents, teachers, and friends, so I just kept doing what I enjoyed. Eventually, I discovered my strengths and got better through practice. Too many adults don’t believe they have the talent for creating art, but a lot of the time it’s just because they stopped doing it so early or stopped enjoying it for the wrong reasons.

Why do you draw?

Usually because I’m inspired by other artists creating stunning work. I see a piece that is beautiful or meaningful, and I’m reminded of the importance of creating and putting artwork out there for people to enjoy. It’s also a really relaxing process for me. I have ADHD and drawing is an effective way for me to slow down and relax while keeping my mind and hands moving. As a student, I was constantly doodling in class, which always helped me attention (though some of my teachers found that hard to believe).

What inspires you?

Other than the inspiration I find in other art, I’m constantly inspired by the beautiful and dramatic world around me. It could be something as little as a leaf or as big as the mountains that gets me feeling creative. And now that I have kids of my own, they inspire me to keep drawing. I see their fearlessness when they create and when they use their imagination. I also want them to see what happens when you pursue what you love and commit yourself to making it a part of your life for the long haul. I remind them that you can make money doing what you love, and you can continue to love doing something even when it doesn’t bring a profit.  

Is it a hobby or your career?

I’m fortunate enough that it’s both. Unfortunately, Inkline Ridge no longer produces an income for me after the brutal Instagram algorithm updates last year; my follower count is 6,000 lower than it was one year ago after a steep decline in visibility. However, I do still work on occasional commissions—most recently for Patagonia—and I do a lot of sketching and illustration as part of my full-time job as a freelance graphic designer. This work tends to be much different than what you see me posting to Instagram, but there’s just as much—if not more—creativity behind it.

Digital vs traditional?

I love spending time with both, so I tend to go through phases. This also depends on the types of projects I’m working on. I tend to work on a lot of digital illustration to support the brands I work with as a freelancer. Working digitally allows me to work efficiently and shift direction and adjust details based on client feedback without taking a hit to my time or their budget. With modern tools like the iPad, Procreate App, and Apple Pencils, I’m still able to add a hand-rendered feel to the digital artwork when needed.

What’s your process?

This definitely varies by project, but if I’m sketching in my classic Inkline Ridge style, I honestly don’t have much of a process. If I’m referencing a real place, I’ll sketch some primary lines in pencil to get the overall shape and proportions right before I pick up my pens. If I’m drawing a more stylized landscape, I’ll often skip the pencil stage and just go for it.

That said, my process for client work goes much deeper, as I’m generally trying to tell a deeper and clearer story for their brand. There’s a learning and planning process that comes before anything to ensure the artwork is not only beautiful, but conveys the right message and tone to the right audience.

How long does it take to create it?

Nearly all the pieces I post to my Instagram account take 15–60 minutes, though my bigger acrylic paintings on wood tend to take 2–3 hours. Often, my smaller drawings will take longer than my really large drawings because I’ll get lost in the details. Even though my trees are usually just little scribbles, it still takes time to lay down a few hundred.  

What is the biggest obstacle that you have faced?

Four years ago, the agency I was working for went under and I was owed a substantial amount of money when I left. My employers at the time were like family to me, so it was financially and emotionally draining for us. To make things worse, my wife and I had just taken custody of my teen brother and sister when we already had to kids of our own. Our mom had passed away a year before, and their dad had just been arrested. So, overnight we went from raising two small kids to also supporting and guiding two struggling teenagers. Desperate to support my family of six, I frantically grabbed hold of some freelance projects while I figured out what was next for us. Needless to say, this period of transition in our lives was turbulent and testing—much more so than my four years as a Marine.  

What is the proudest moment that you have achieved?

Overcoming those hardships is by far my proudest moment. Not just because I’m proud of myself for pushing through and coming out stronger on the other side, but because I am deeply proud of my family; my wife for lovingly and meticulously managing our crazy family life, and my kids (brother and sister included) for keeping their heads up and moving forward when times were rough.

You have one day to live; how do you spend it?

With my family on mountain trails, exploring this beautiful world and laughing along the way.

How can people get in contact with you?

Social Links:

IG: @inklineridge

Website: Inklineridge.com

Website:  bobgan.com

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Food Art

How do you paint food? (and I’m not asking how do you paint Easter eggs) Using vivid, bright colours, or subtle, muted shades? loose or tight, sketchy or detailed and precise? these are a matter of personal style, of course. The same is true when it comes to the choice of media. These three ladies use their signature styles and watercolour to paint some of Instagram’s most memorable edibles. 

Marina Pravnik @marinapravnikart, from Ukraine, applies a very delicate palette of soft, highly diluted colours to her botanical illustrations. You could say she paints with tinted water – water with a drop of colour – which results in exceptionally graceful, refined compositions with vintage feel.

Another Marina, from Saint Petersburg, Marina Lasaeva Orlyuk @marina_lasaeva_orlyuk, prefers a more illustrative, loose style of painting. Her fruit, florals, still life and landscapes are marked by an airiness and spontaneity of a thorough colour connoisseur, an aesthete predominantly interested in the play of colours, shades and contrasts.


Moscow-based artist Ksenia Tikhomirova @ksyu_t_art is a hyper-realist intrigued by the most minuscule details – the microscopic hairs on a bee, tiny slivers of light under the water droplets, beginnings of the process of oxidation on apple cuts, barely perceivable variations in tones between onion peels… If Ksenia decided to challenge her audience, we’d have a hard time picking the real object vs her painting of it.

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Любите лук?🧅Я только в приготовленном виде или в роли натурщика😁 ⠀ Минус рисования с натуры – приходится дышать ароматом объекта😏Зато казалось, что это пахнет моя нарисованная луковица и хотелось сделать её ещё реалистичнее. ⠀ А вообще с этим луком дурацкая вышла история. Мне не понравилась моя роза (см предыдущий пост), и хорошая бумага #saunderswaterfordpaper как раз закончилась. Ну и я, не долго думая, начала рисовать лук на обратной стороне листа с розой (откровенно говоря, очень часто использую обе стороны бумаги). И тут внезапно появился человек, желающий эту розу купить😮Я согласилась, но вот лук заканчивала с мыслью, что будет у него незавидная судьба изнаночной стороны картины. Это тем более обидно, что мне в кои-то веки понравился результат (процентов на 80%😀). ⠀ Сижу вот теперь и думаю: начинать новую иллюстрацию на обратной стороне пиона, ждать новую бумагу аж до среды или отрезать под ботанику кусок среднезернистого Арша🤔 ⠀ #ksyu_t_botanic __________________________________________________ Do you like onions? I definitely liked to draw it🙂

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Visit Lana’s Instagram gallery @calico.brush

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Watercolour White

Watercolour white is a total conundrum – added to other paints it destroys transparency, one of the most treasured qualities of aquarell art, added on top of watercolour layers does the same, without really whitening the area, layered over white paper remains invisible and useless… so most watercolour artists suggest leaving the white areas untouched, claiming “there’s no white in watercolour, our white is the white of the paper”. But for the white to truly glow, some colours and shades have to be added. Here’s how these three masters solve the problem.

Using the tinted paper and gouache, in addition to watercolour, is the way Marie Silver @marie_silver_36 resolves the dilemma. Marie’s sketchbooks provide a series of wonderful examples, showing how mixing the media can help preserve the looseness and beauty of watercolour, while allowing for a more graphic and concrete presentation.

Evgenya Babicheva Sheglova @evgenyasheglova, master of botanical illustration, has a keen eye for myriads of soft shades of gray, blue, green and yellow found in seemingly ‘plain white’ flowers. In addition, Evgenya manages to find the right consistency of each shade, so the resulting artwork ends up being entirely breathtaking.

Watercolour artist and teacher Stephanie Boechat @stephanie_boechat uses wide tonal range of Payne’s gray and dark blues to shape beautifully loose watercolour painting of a white lighthouse. Leaving the white of the paper on lightest parts, Stephanie adds shades of grey gradually, starting with the most diluted, lightest tone and ending with the most saturated colour in the shaded areas.

Visit Lana’s Instagram gallery @calico.brush

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Forest Black by Anette Sommerset

Thanks Anette aka @ankatsom for taking part in our black and white illustrators’ interview series! 

How long have you been drawing?

 I’ve been drawing for as long as I can remember. As far back as in kindergarten I was mostly interested in painting and drawing. As soon as I had a pen in my hand growing up I started doodling. In 2016 I slowly started to get more serious about it.

What’s your process?

 I always start by making fast sketches, mostly to try out ideas and find a good composition. I have a small book that I use for this purpose.  After that I draw it on a piece of paper using a pencil.  Once I’m satisfied with how it looks I finish it with ink pens. If I decide to draw it digitally I take a picture of the sketch and import it to a drawing program on my iPad.

Digital vs traditional?

 It’s not so long ago since I started to draw digitally. I enjoy it, but I think it’s something special about the traditional way. Somehow I feel more in control when I draw with pen and paper.

How long does it take to create it?

 Normally it takes between 1-4 hours, depending on the complexity and the technique I use. Most of the pieces I make are not very big in size. When drawing bigger I sometimes spend a few days on a drawing.

Is it a hobby or your career?

 It’s turning in to a career, which I’m very grateful for.

Why do you draw?

 Most of all because I love it. I always did and I think I always will. One of the things I really like is to get lost in a drawing. I find it very relaxing at the same time as it keeps me focused. I suppose you could say it’s therapeutic in a way.

What inspires you?

 Nature is my biggest source of inspiration. I grew up in Norway with beautiful nature all around. Sometimes it’s enough for me to go hiking in the woods to find new ideas. I also always liked geometry and patterns. I suppose that’s why I like to combine it with nature in my designs.

What is the proudest moment that you have achieved?

 A couple of years back I made a decision to leave my job and what I considered safe and familiar behind in order to move to another country.  Even it was challenging I knew it was the right thing for me to do, and I know I’ll never regret it.

What is the biggest obstacle that you have faced?

 Working on becoming a full time artist. It definitely takes a lot of effort, but it’s what I feel the most that I want to do.

You have one day to live, how do you spend it?

 I would spend it with the people I love. It wouldn’t matter so much what we would be doing as long as we would be together.

How can people get in contact with you?

Feel free to send me an email or direct message on IG anytime.

Email: ankatsom@gmail.com

Instagram: www.instagram.com/ankatsom

Online shop: www.sommersethart.bigcartel.com

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Interview with architect and illustrator David Bülow

Thanks David aka @bulow_ink for taking part in our black and white illustrators’ interview series!

How long have you been drawing?

Since forever. As a child I would always be drawing, alone or with friends. Even when I didn’t have paper, I’m told I would be drawing in the air with my finger. I still do that, annoying I think. Every schoolbook and later notes from meetings has always been smeared with drawings and doodles. The funny thing is, that I remember conversations and situations better from looking at the drawings than reading my own notes, because my handwriting is so crappy.

What’s your process?

It varies. Sometimes I know excactly what the final result will be, and finish within an hour going straight to ink. Sometimes I do pencil sketches forever to capture the right movement or mood.

Digital vs traditional?

Both and more! I cherish the feeling of paper and pen, the sound and smell. I love that it is irreversible, that it counts. That there is no cmd + z and you have to include your accidental inkdrops or mistakes, or start over. It gives a focus and feeling of presence I sometimes find it difficult to find in the digital realm. For the bulow_ink project I only use traditional materials. But I work a lot from my Ipad and enjoy it as well, for architectural illustration, competition projects I use it professionally with my office.

I am experimenting with photogravure technique these days, a wonderful mix of digital crafts and traditional crafts. I hope to beging sharing the results soon, very excited!

How long does it take to create it?

It’s normally a wonderfully slow thing. Anything between a few minutes and days.

Is it a hobby or your career?

I don’t do hobbies, only passions. I work as an architect and run the architectural office @primus_arkitekter, where drawing by hand is a vital part of my work. The ink drawing is a creative outlet and art project, a place where you can let your imagination run and get lost in the sweetest possible way.

Why do you draw?

I can’t help it.

What inspires you?

I guess we all take inspiration from everything around us. I’m always enjoying people interacting with cities and architecture. Having personal moments in the context of the built environment. The climate crisis inspires me to act and draw, not only in the apocalyseporn-style, but as a way to raise awareness and inspire action. Women inspire me on a daily basis. The elegance and expressions of female gestures. I recently opened @bulow_kink for this fascination.

What are you working on right now?

I am working on a grapic novel on the daily life with bipolar disorder with my girlfriend Tina (who is the bipolar one) – she writes and I draw. The process is posted on insta @the.other.party – it´s a very meaningful process for both of us, to bring awareness and eliminate stigma – and try to have a laugh about it too. I hope you will follow and support it. This project is btw completely done digitally on the Ipad

And then I’m getting started on a book project describing emotions and experiences of urban spaces. I got a grant from the Danish Arts Foundation (thanks btw) to help finding time for it besides my architectural practice. And now made an timeline for the project with my publisher

With my office @primus_arkitekter we´re working on a theatre building in Odsherred, a library and culture house in Viby – and last week we handed in a competition bid for the new headquarters for the Roskilde Festival. Very exciting

Where do you sell your works?

At shows – and I have a webshop bulowink.bigcartel.com and a small gallery here in Copenhagen @blandtandet has several glissée prints for sale. I sell originals only by personal contact – so dm on Instagram for requests

What is the proudest moment that you have achieved?

Here goes a wornout kliché, but nothing beats the birth of my wonderful daughter – though the achievement was entirely my girlfriends

What is the biggest obstacle that you have faced?

If we overcome the basic obstacles like getting out of bed, providing food, staying healthy, multiplying and in general being a decent person – the biggest obstacle often proves to be your own ego.

You have one day to live, how do you spend it?

I’d rob a bank and invite all my friends to restaurant Niu in Miami or a teppanyaki place in Tokyo for a night of tasting, laughing and drawing. No doubt. Ought to do it before it’s my last day though.

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Wet-in-Wet Magic

We all know watercolour wet-in-wet is the best thing since discovery of the hot water – no question about it! Even though this beautiful technique simply boils down to adding (wet) paint to the wet surface, one needs to understand how wet, how much paint, when to stop and how exactly to direct the delicate play of colours, in order to create something magical. The following three masters of the technique should be used as an example!

Interior designer and watercolour artist Alla Kontsedaylova @allakontsedaylova from Belarus paints the most breathtaking florals. Vibrant yet airy, saturated yet transparent and light, clearly recognizable but still deliciously loose, as if not made by the human hand. Most definitely the complete mastery of wet-in-wet technique, in addition to Alla’s outstanding sense for tonal range and entrancing colour combinations.

Jane Davies @janedavieswatercolours, based in UK, provides a gallery of equally flawless artwork. Specializing in pet portraits and British wildlife, Jane paints magnificently loose animal portraits and the fluffiest birds of pray. Jane also teaches the art of loose painting and watercolour flow and, in her Daniel Smith step-by-step tutorial, suggests you “need to be a fairy in big boots” – “bold of heart and light of touch” when painting. 

Canadian artist Dawn Wood @watercolourjoy, just like all the wet-in-wet masters, seems to create paintings by pure magic, without brushes or ever touching the paper. Dawn shows enviable skill in her free-flowing florals and the entire family of enchanting kitties, birds and wildlife, but her ability to suggest shapes forming out of sheer splashes of watery paint is most obvious in her ethereal landscapes.

Visit Lana’s Instagram gallery @calico.brush

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Lucid dreams and psychedelic experiences by artist Aleks Nocny

Thanks Aleks aka @aleks_nocny for taking part in our illustrators’ interview series!

How long have you been drawing?

I’ve been sculpting, painting and drawing probably 13 years now. Sculpting was probably the first thing I’ve done when I was a kid and that how it started. Growing in poor country like Ukraine in late 80’s you don’t have many toys, so you creating them. You have to travel to fantasy world to have fun and enjoy your life and see some colour surrounded by grey and old buildings and sadness of communist country. I was always been interested in art, drawing and creating -out of clay, wood, whatever is playable. Illustrations and tattoo designing also tattooing is my full time job now.

What’s your process?

I usually work and create at night. I can’t focus at daytime, so always waiting for a bit of darkness behind the window. ‘Noc’ in Polish means ‘Night’.:) 

Depends what I do, but always starts from green tea or weak coffee and music or podcast. I’m really into a Terrence McKenna podcasts and his voice always calms my mind down and let me open for whatever is coming to my brain:)

Digital vs traditional?

Most of my drawings are digital now, I think if someone create that super tool like Ipad to make artist life easier, why not. I still respect hand drawing and doing it from time to time, but my tattoo design are all done digitally. It’s just easier and quicker. Still love smell of paper or acrylic pain, even unpacking of blank new canvas still give me a smile.

How long does it take to create it?

Depends what and how deep I want to go with it. I love detail, in illustration, tattoo designs, my paintings or sculptures. Every different think I do taking different amount of time. Sometimes I start and finish something month or year after. 

Is it a hobby or your career?

My hobby is my career..I love everything I do and I still having fun if I can create an illustration, funky drawing, new print , sculpture or T-shirt design. I feel like very important in my life is to finish what I started,that gives me energy to start creating something new. I like how thing are growing around me, my followers, my customers, sales etc, but also I like to see my stuff around, like paintings or sculptures, like to be surrounded by things I do. It doesn’t mean I like it all, but it reminds me that I accomplish something and didn’t give up.

Why do you draw?

I can’t imagine to do anything different that create art. Art is big part of my life and its something I’m focusing on most of my time.I don’t have kids or wife who will be distract me, I got all time for myself and thats why I do. Life is too short for sitting in front of TV and live other people’s life. My way of joy in life is to create. That’s why I do so many thing because I’m still looking and trying new things.

What inspires you?

I always liked fantasy, mythical creatures and stuff like this. Recently my stronger inspirations are visions from my lucid dreams and psychodelic experiences I had. I’m not ashamed of that than I use ‘drugs’ sometimes, but its all come from nature and if I can connect with nature and experience and see new things that I never seen before, why not. 

What is the proudest moment that you have achieved?

Probably my proudest moment was when my mural design won the competition and it was painted on massive wall in the town centre where I lived. My town organised a competition for artists to design mural in memory of one of the popular Polish artist. My design been selected with 2 others and they let the whole town vote. I won..That was the best feeling I had for very long time, still proud of that, even that wasn’t very creative design..:)

What is the biggest obstacle that you have faced?

Probably trying to live and create in Norway. I love the country and I will definitely come back there one day. My language barrier and the way how nobody wants to talk to you seriously because you don’t bark in Norwegian language. That was couple years ago and probably lots of things changed, but I never feel so uncomfortable and useless in my life, so spent time traveling instead:)

You have one day to live, how do you spend it?

If I only have one day to spend, I will probably do everything I can and go and see my Mother and spend some time with her. She live in different country and we don’t see each other very often. So that what I will probably do. Riding a full speed on motorcycle, sniffing coke from silicone tits and gambling with unlimited amount of money will do after death or in another life:)

How can people get in contact with you? 

My instagram is: @aleks_nocny

My new arty insta page is: @nocne_mary

My little Etsy store is: www.etsy.com/uk/shop/nocnemary

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Traditional to Modern

Digital, collage, mixed media… are only few of the ways classic illustration, art and design is transformed from traditional to modern, contemporary artistic vision, with unique perspective and creative mark of each individual artist. The following three British artists have made these transformations singularly stylish and exceptional.

  
Katie Scott @katiekatiescott is a well established anatomical and botanical illustrator from London, with a number of published books, including The Story of Life: Evolution, Animalium and Botanicum. Drawing inspiration from traditional medical and botanical illustration, and using science as a springboard for her art, Katie creates brilliant digital spreads of flora and fauna, which The Guardian art gallery featuring her work, aptly calls ‘psychedelic’. 

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Print shop is back online 🌻 www.katie-scott.com/shop

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Collage artist, surface pattern designer and illustrator Clover Robin @clover_robin, based in London, England, “delights in nature and all things botanical, inspired by a childhood of woodland walks, countryside rambles and fossil hunting by the sea”. Using acrylic, gouache and colored pencils, Clover creates stunning patterns and textures for her prints and collages, ranging in subjects from flowers and vegetables, through still life and landscapes, to animals, birds and interiors.

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Squat Paperwhites

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A dedicated people watcher, Angela Smyth @angela_smyth_artist, is a self-taught professional artist based in West Yorkshire, with a keen ability for abstraction which, paired with her bold use of flat colour, results in strong graphic interpretation of what seems like the very essence of the subject. Angela’s people, animals, ships and towns have an allegorical and emblematic quality. According to the artist herself, Angela’s cityscapes “always have something hidden in them (…) an element to my work that isn’t obvious”. 

Visit Lana’s Instagram gallery @calico.brush

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Nadine Safa’s graceful illustrations

Thanks Nadine aka @vuvie__ for taking part in our illustrators’ interview series!

How long have you been drawing?

I have been drawing since I could hold a pencil. I chose to study Graphic design because I always knew I wanted to pursue a creative career in which I can use my illustrating skills. I worked for a packaging design studio, and I would hand draw whenever I got the opportunity and was lucky enough to illustrate for some major brands!

What is your process?

I sketch loosely until I am happy with the concept and composition. I mix and test my colours and create my colour palette. I then re-draw with clean light lines onto good quality watercolour paper and paint away!

Digital or traditional? 

I love and enjoy both, however personally I have more of an appreciation for traditional. I enjoy the challenge, of creating by hand a texture or effect rather than have a digital brush do it for me. It’s a lot harder to fix mistakes and you can’t just tap two fingers to undo! So it definitely gives me more of a sense of achievement or accomplishment. Which is a great feeling and one of the reasons I enjoy painting so much.

I also feel like traditional is a whole experience in itself. Mixing paints, the smells, the textures etc. it’s much more enjoyable and fulfilling to me.

How long does it take to create it?

I like to paint with a lot of detail! so it takes quite some time. I also parent my two kids solo for a few months at a time, due to my husbands work travels. So I’m limited to painting only when they’re asleep as they are still pre-schoolers and need a lot of attention and care. 

Is it a hobby or a career?

At the moment it’s a hobby as my priority is my children until they’re in school and I have some more time to commit to it. I’m currently in the process of setting up an online store. The plan is to start selling some high quality art prints and see where that takes me!

Why do you draw?

I always drew because it was something that I loved to do, something I felt good at which made me happy. However, after having children my reason to draw changed and my art evolved and found its purpose. 

Motherhood transformed me and nature awakened me and my art became almost like a spiritual practice. I felt excited to translate the way nature made me feel into art, and try and spread that feeling to as many people possible. I also like to paint with the intention of raising awareness to climate change and protecting nature/oceans/wildlife whenever I can, and inspire others to want to make a change.

What is the proudest moment you have achieved?

My proudest moment in my personal life would be having my two daughters, parenting has taught me a lot about my self and my strengths.

My proudest moment in my career would’ve been seeing my illustrations on a whole range of LUX products in Japan, and also on some other major supermarket brands. It was such an incredible feeling seeing my art on supermarket products and store shelves!

What is the biggest obstacle that you have faced?

In terms of my art and skill, I guess my toughest obstacle was to silence my inner critic and believe that my art is good enough and worthy of being shared.

What inspires you?

Nature is my greatest inspiration. I have always been drawn to nature. However, it wasn’t until I noticed how my toddler (at the time) was so curious and fascinated by a flower, or a leaf. That I began to look a lot closely, just as she did. And I started to see all of these incredible details and all of a sudden it was so much more than a flower, it was like a living work of art and I became mesmerised and I really connected with Mother Nature on a spiritual level. 

How can people contact you?

People can contact me on my Instagram page @vuvie__ or email me on vuvie.creative@gmail.com.

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Painting Mushrooms

There’s a million and one way to paint a subject, mushrooms included (mushrooms, perhaps, in a million ways more than any other subject, given their sheer variety).

The following three Instagram artists, each in their own way, have created a beautiful tribute to the simple little mushie.

Australian illustrator Karen Colenso @karencolenso has a very special touch when it comes to all things botanical. A true watercolour master, Karen never fails to bring the best qualities of the medium to the fore: transparency, fluidity and softness which, paired with her drawing skills, results in some of the most magical, airy, brilliant artwork. Karen’s whimsical collection is just as charming and equally precious. 

Madalina Tantareanu @madalinadraws, a Romanian graphic designer and illustrator based in Berlin, uses mainly ink and watercolour to tell her stories. Distinctly graphic in nature, her illustrations are very often monochrome and highly detailed, as well as decorative. Madalina focuses on small creatures, botanicals, birds, forest animals, and on nostalgic renderings of cityscapes.

Born in Brazil, Brunna Frade @brunnafrade.art lives and paints in Mantiqueira Mountains, so it’s no wonder nature, spirits of the forest and of the mountain are the main source of her inspiration. According to Brunna, she illustrates “affection, dreams, memories, places” and everything else her imagination conjures. Using watercolour as her main medium, Brunna paints delightful portraits, in addition to flora, fauna, mythical beings and esoteric objects.

Visit Lana’s Instagram gallery @calico.brush

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Nanna Boegekaer’s eclectic illustrations

Thanks Nanna aka @littleboegekaer for taking part in our black and white illustrators’ interview series!

How long have you been drawing?

Since 2012/13, I think. I started late!

What’s your process?

I just draw whenever I get an idea really. It’s an urge most of all. I don’t really get the process but it feels magical at times.

Digital vs traditional?

Oof. Traditional is my first love but digital is growing on me.

How long does it take to create it?

Anything between five minutes and days.

Is it a hobby or your career?

It’s become a lifestyle for me. It’s become so integrated in my daily life that it’s just something I do like getting out of bed.

Why do you draw?

Because I don’t know how not to.

What inspires you?

Often it’s people. They put me in a certain mood, or say something that gives me the urge to create something. If I meet someone interesting, I often get a lot of ideas.

What is the proudest moment that you have achieved?

A tie between having drawings published in a book this year and starting my business back in 2016 when I was just 20!

What is the biggest obstacle that you have faced?

Letting people in.

You have one day to live, how do you spend it?

I’d hug everyone I love, eat my favorite things, listen to my favorite songs, and then I’d go see the ocean – maybe even going for a swim.

How can people get in contact with you?

Messages on Instagram are always welcomed! But I’m on Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr as well. Email is okay too! Also wont stop you if you send a bird.

Links for social media:

https://www.facebook.com/littleboegekaer

https://twitter.com/littleboegekaer

https://littleboegekaer.tumblr.com/

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… in case you need it. 💛

A post shared by Nanna Bøgekær (@littleboegekaer) on

Nanna, her desk where she works, two pictures of her home – one where she lives in Copenhagen-ish and then one where it’s more possible to see that it’s Copenhagen, her dog (her name is Poe!), and then the view from where she live with her beloved plants! Aso, Toulouse, her second home

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The Art of Sketching

How quickly can you paint something, giving it shape, volume, texture and colour, thus making it instantly recognizable, without getting bogged down in unnecessary fluff and the grip of perfectionism?

The art of sketching is going through a major revival, thanks to the permanent appeal of the fresh, uncluttered, intuitive artwork that allows the viewer’s eye to complete the picture on its own.

The following three Instagram artists are certainly among the masters of the art form. 

Australian architect and artist Liz Steel @lizsteelart is a self-professed “obsessive sketcher”. From her daily and weekly menus, through the urban scenes, landscapes, illustrations of her colour palettes and art tools, all the way down to portraits, Liz sketches her life journey with a passion and zest of a true art lover. Famous for her masterful collection of teacup sketches, Liz teaches both live workshops and online, at SketchingNow.com and her website.

Jennie Kessinger @jennie_kessinger, based in States, is another passionate sketcher, dedicated to daily practice of the art. Using mainly watercolor, ink and gouache, Jennie fills her growing collection of over 50 sketchbooks with urban sketches, scenes from her road trips, interiors, drawings and illustrations of animals, plants, food, drink, landscapes and virtually any and all objects that land in her field of vision. 

Lisa Livoni @lisalivoni from Portland, Oregon, is a well-established watercolour artist, with a number of solo exhibitions throughout USA under her belt. Although not necessarily a sketcher, Lisa’s intuitive, loose and wonderfully vibrant art is marked by the spontaneity and freshness of a skilled master. Using botany as her main subject, Lisa’s brush never adds a single stroke more than is absolutely essential to create a brilliant work of art. 

Visit Lana’s Instagram gallery @calico.brush

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Inky Monochromes by Ellie Morris

Thanks Ellie aka @elliemdesign for taking part in our black and white illustrators’ interviews series! 

How long have you been drawing?

Since I was a tiny human. I’ve always been more practical than academic, much preferring to hold a paintbrush or put on a pair of running shoes than pick up a practice test. 

What’s your process?

Sketch, question it, re-sketch and question it again. I can sit on an idea for six months or I can picture an idea immediately, there is no in-between.  

Digital vs traditional?

Pen on paper is unbeatable, but my finished work is completed and produced digitally.

How long does it take to create it?

It varies, from a few hours to a couple of days, totally dependent on the design.

Is it a hobby or your career?

Both. I work full time to pay to live, freelance to build my portfolio (& buy that takeaway occasionally) and then I create for fun too. 

What inspires you?

A mass of things: nature, space, architecture, etc. The artists I follow, they are all incredible & inspiring. 

What is the proudest moment that you have achieved?

The week I consumed 2.5kg of Nutella? But truthfully, it’s seeing my work out in the world. Nothing is better than helping people or making them smile. I was lucky enough to work with a musician on t-shirt illustrations that raised over $10,000 for a U.K charity; his supporters are incredible.

What is the biggest obstacle that you have faced?

Like many, I struggle with my mental health everyday. After University I was at one of my lowest points, with unsupportive staff & suffering family loss, my anxiety levels & self-belief were extremely poor. I still wonder whether or not I am good enough for this community however my Nan always told me to try my best because it’s all you can do, just don’t give up. Those are the words to live by.

You have one day to live, how do you spend it?

With family, trying to drag them on a flight to New York. It’s a place I have always wanted to go. 

How can people get in contact with you? EmailInstagram or Twitter. I work on custom projects from branding to packaging, to one off prints and tattoo designs.

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Sketchbook Magic

Ask watercolour artists about their favorite art supplies and you’ll get many different answers – from preferred brushes, paints and paper, to absolute must-have palettes, white pens or masking fluids. But one thing we all love and have in common, which is often not mentioned, are sketchbooks. There’s something magical about sketchbooks, like painting your own journey and leafing through your most uplifting dreams. The following three artists fully illustrate that appeal. 

Kristina Gavrilova @xtina_gavrilova_art, based in Russia, paints deliciously loose urban scenes, architectural elements, intricate street lanterns and florals. Transparency and luminosity of Kristina’s watercolour are precisely the qualities that make this medium ever-popular, and unique perspectives and compositions of her paintings bring her artwork to the fore. Leaning towards the cooler side of the colour wheel, Kristina mostly reaches for soft purples, pinks, blues and greens. She also teaches the art of watercolour on Skillshare and on the Russian Master Classes website. 

Slovenian artist Sara Kajba @moonchildillustrations uses watercolour, markers, coloured pencils, acrylics and other media to create unique stories and characters. Distinguished by the rich autumnal palette, with rusts, oranges, reds and earths dominating her work, Sara’s art is an imaginative combination of the classic children-book style illustration and manga-inspired art. Sara also loves to “draw with you”, inviting you to give her prompts for the new characters and sketches.